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Current Issue
July, 2019
Volume 45, Number 2
  
9 April 2013
Greg Kandra




A young student poses for a picture at a Jesuit-run school in Minya, Upper Egypt. (photo: Sean Sprague)

Several years ago, we profiled some ambitious Jesuit-run schools in Egypt:

The Jesuits have a long history of being educators in Minya. On the same campus as the Center for the Handicapped is a primary and preparatory school founded in 1889. The Jesuit Fathers school also receives scholarship grants from CNEWA. The 800-pupil school is run by five Jesuit priests and one brother, two of whom are Egyptians, two are Maltese, one is French and the other is Dutch. Also on staff are a number of Christian and Muslim teachers.

Jesuit Father Joseph Mizi, the school’s director, said the school is one of the best in the district even though it primarily serves the poorer children of the area. Built in the 1880’s, the school was disguised so it would not look like a church. Today, it looks like any other school building, but the spire looks surprisingly like the minaret of a mosque. …

Christians make up about only 6 percent of the population, but with their many outstanding schools they have made a significant impact on the country. The Jesuits, by working with disabled persons and the very poor, are helping the nation’s most underprivileged to shine.

Read more about schools taking children From Dust to Dignity in the November-December 2002 issue of the magazine.



Tags: Egypt Education Interreligious Catholic education