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Current Issue
December, 2018
Volume 44, Number 4
  
11 February 2019
CNEWA Staff




The staff and students of Bethlehem's Paul VI Ephpheta Institute. (photo: Ephpheta/CNEWA)

We recently received this report on the most recent semester at Bethlehem's Paul VI Ephpheta Institute for the Deaf, which CNEWA has supported for decades. As we described it in the pages of our magazine:

Ephpheta was founded at the Pope’s request after his visit to the Holy Land in 1964. Supported almost entirely by CNEWA, Ephpheta admits children on the basis of need, not their parents’ ability to pay. Ephpheta is run by the Sisters of Saint Dorothy, a largely Italian community dedicated to spreading the love of Christ through fostering human and Christian development. Although engaged in many types of educational and social work, the sisters have specialized in educating the deaf.

The latest:

Currently, there are 182 students attending classes at Ephpheta Institute; at the beginning of the school year, the number of students fluctuated (more or less) according to various reasons: new students enrolled at the school while some students due to several factors such as difficult access issues; expensive transportation costs which parents cannot afford; change of residence; and other personal reasons/ decisions taken by parents. Currently, there are 14 or 15 students enrolled in the kindergarten and preschool; in the upper classes, the attendance tends to decrease.

Teacher training and activities (divided by class), were drawn up in accordance with the new academic programs offered by the Palestinian Ministry of Education. The common goal agreed upon, is to deepen the value of respect and cooperation towards oneself and others. This value involves teachers and students and will be implemented within the year through various initiatives and activities.

During the past four months, several initiatives have been implemented to help develop the skills of the students and help them overcome, at least in part, the “barrier” which may affect them psychologically, and their ability to communicate. The initiative included various activities such as Arabic dance, art, music, cooking and student-to-student exchange with semester.

Students learn to express themselves through fingerpainting. (photo: Ephpheta/CNEWA)

Students also had the opportunity to get creative, participating in a course by “CheArte” an organization dedicated to children’s expression through art. During the course, both students and teachers learned how to express their emotions using art forms and color. They learned how emotions can deeply affect us and by using art, to express their inner feelings, helping them to improve their wellbeing.

The teachers also participated in a workshop and ‘formation courses’ in cooperation with the Ministry of Education which taught them how to present the new revised curriculum to students. Ephpheta Institute also continued to offer parents workshops that raised awareness and enhance understanding of the needs of deaf children and how to be an effective, supportive parent.

Finally, all operators, teachers, speech therapists, specialists, continue to demonstrate commitment in carrying out their role with the aim to accompany and help students towards a positive assimilation into Palestinian society.

You can read more about the institute below:

The Miracle of Ephpheta

A Milestone: Ephpheta’s First High School Graduation



Tags: CNEWA Bethlehem

6 February 2019
CNEWA Staff




Jim Kingham and Anastasia Shkilnyk. (photo: courtesy Jim Kingham)

The current edition of ONE contains the hope-filled story of how Caritas Ukraine — with support from CNEWA — is offering the elderly poor a Window to the World, giving new life and possibility to some of the country’s neediest men and women.

In the course of his reporting, writer Mark Raczkiewycz spoke with Jim Kingham from Canada who, along with his now deceased wife, Anastasia Shkilnyk, has been an ardent supporter of this work:

They have contributed more than a half million dollars to implement a program in Ukraine similar to one in Canada: Medical equipment is purchased for Caritas, which in turn lends or rents it to the elderly. Family members then are shown how to use walkers and other life-easing equipment with their older relatives.

They started donating because, as he told us, “we felt that … elderly people have given so much to their children, too often not appreciated or recognized, that the least we could do is offer a little comfort, with freedom from financial worries when they need medical equipment, while still preserving their dignity.”

Five years ago, we told the story of the Kinghams on our blog — and noted with sadness the death of Jim’s wife, Anastasia:

We have known Anastasia as a generous person who strived to make the world a better place and who succeeded in changing many hearts.

Being a Ukrainian Canadian, she cared particularly about the marginalized people of Canada and Ukraine; however, her generosity knew no geographic borders. During her fulfilling life, she championed the principles of social justice and spent enormous amounts of personal time and resources to help victims of discrimination.

In 2013, together with her husband Dr. Jim Kingham, she established with CNEWA Canada a special endowment fund to support social justice projects in Ukraine. A modest woman, Anastasia refused to have the endowment named after her. This year, the endowment will start continuously supporting the charitable initiatives of Caritas Ukraine. One of these projects will be lending medical equipment, free of charge, to poor people with serious temporary and permanent disabilities.

The legacy of Anastasia’s writings, actions and of her sacrificial love will continue transforming lives in many countries. You can read more about her remarkable life in this tribute*, on the website for Ukrainian Catholic University.

To discover more of the good fruits of the Kinghams’ generosity — and the generosity of so many others around the world — read Windows to the World in the December 2018 edition of ONE.

* [Editor’s note: The original “tribute” hyperlink destination no longer exists; the link in the text now points to an Archive.Org preserved copy. For another Ukrainian Catholic University piece celebrating the life of Anastasia Shkilnyk, click here.]



Tags: Ukraine CNEWA Canada Caritas

1 February 2019
CNEWA Staff




The corridors at the Rosary Sisters School used to be open to the cold and rain. (photo: CNEWA)

We received the following good news from Laura Schau-Tarazi in our Jerusalem office:

Every winter, students and teachers of the Rosary Sisters School in Bethlehem had to brave the harsh conditions of the second and third floor corridors, which were open to the rain and covered with large puddles due to the lack of windows. Many classes are held on both floors and hundreds of students and teachers use the corridor daily in order to get to and from class. All of the students and teachers needed to wear winter coats, hats and gloves every day for the entire season. Teachers complained that the open corridors created cold, damp conditions in the classrooms, putting everyone at risk for contracting viruses, colds and the flu. The school building is well over 100 years old and the need for rehabilitation work continues to be a serious issue, especially since the building must meet modern safety codes.

The sisters appealed to CNEWA to help the school enclose the corridors with panels containing large aluminum windows. With a generous grant from the Representative Office of Germany in Ramallah, we were able to procure and install the windows that sealed off both corridors.

CNEWA helped provide a grant to enclose the corridors. (photo: CNEWA)

Plaster and paint were also applied to the problem areas. Additionally, the project hired three local laborers as well as a local engineer who inspected the work.

The work was completed during the Christmas break, allowing students and teachers to return to a warmer, dryer school!

Now the students and their teachers are able to walk the corridors without worrying about the weather. (photo: CNEWA)



Tags: Education Bethlehem

18 January 2019
CNEWA Staff




Some of the young people at the Kidane Mehret Children's Home share their Christmas joy.
(photo: CNEWA)


Earlier this week, our regional director in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Argaw Fantu, forwarded to us this lovely note and some pictures from our old friend Sister Lutgarda, of the Kidane Mehret Children’s Home. Thanks to our generous benefactors, CNEWA once again was able to send a donation to help the young people celebrate Christmas:

Peaceful greetings to all from Kidane Mehret Children’s Home!!

How beautiful a day can be when kindness touches it! These are the words with which I would like to thank each one of you, who have fundraised for our dear children. The generous sum of $5,000 has been received through CNEWA to celebrate the Christmas party for our children. It came truly in a good time, when we are preparing for Christmas.

I wish again and again that one day one of you will be here to participate and experience the joy of our children as they share their talents and receive their gifts.

To you and to all those who have donated this money, in the name of all the sisters and our dear children, I would like to express to you our heartfelt thanks for your kind and generous donation you have sent us for all these years. Hope that all of you are keeping well.

We have no words to thank you for your generosity. Every small donation counts. Whatever money remains of the party will go toward buying some items of food for the children and milk for the smaller ones.

Be sure that we will include you in our daily prayers and we ask the good Lord to continue to shower his choicest blessings upon each one of you and on your family. We wish you a very happy year to you and all your families.

God bless you all!

Sister Lutgarda Camilleri

Sister Lutgarda poses with some of the children at the home. (photo; CNEWA)



Tags: Ethiopia

15 January 2019
CNEWA Staff




The Rev Thomas Rosica interviews Tim McCarthy, who manages CNEWA’s digital assets, and Msgr. John E. Kozar, CNEWA’s president, for Canada’s Salt + Light Television. (photo: CNEWA)

We were delighted to welcome to the New York office this morning the Rev. Thomas Rosica, CSB, who is the CEO of Salt + Light Catholic Media Foundation and the guiding light behind Salt + Light TV, the booming Catholic television channel in Canada, which now streams online around the world.

Father Rosica is producing a segment on CNEWA for the channel. As part of the story, he interviewed our president, Msgr. Kozar, our digital assets manager, Tim McCarthy and multimedia editor Deacon Greg Kandra about the work we do and how we share that work through our magazine and online.

Msgr. Kozar and Tim McCarthy explain CNEWA’s mission during the interview with Father Rosica. (photo: CNEWA)

It was a privilege and a pleasure to host him and his production team. We look forward to being able to share our story with others through Salt + Light. Stay tuned!

Msgr. Kozar and Father Rosica. (photo: CNEWA)



Tags: CNEWA

19 December 2018
CNEWA Staff




The December 2018 edition of ONE is now online.

Christmas arrived early this year: we’ve just posted the December edition of ONE online. Look for it in your mailbox, soon!

This edition focuses on those we are calling “The Caregivers” — and within its pages you will find some of the many ways CNEWA works to extend care and compassion to those in need.

You will discover how a mobile clinic visits the marginalized Dalits in India, bringing them care and Healing the Forgotten.

We’ll take you to A Refuge in Lebanon serving Syrian refugees.

And you will see how compassionate caregivers in Ukraine offer the elderly Windows to the World.

To experience the powerful photography and award-winning journalism of ONE, read more of our digital magazine at this link. And check out Msgr. John E. Kozar’s video preview of the latest edition below.

Have a blessed Christmas!



Tags: CNEWA

12 December 2018
CNEWA Staff




The CNEWA Canada staff receives a generous donation from Archbishop Terrence Prendergast of Ottawa. (photo: CNEWA Canada)

We received some happy news this week from our office in Canada:

CNEWA Canada is honored to have been chosen as one of the beneficiaries of the “Archbishop’s Charity Dinner” in Ottawa that took place back in October. The theme of the dinner was “Healing, Near and Far.”

We recently received a generous donation of $40,000 to CNEWA from the proceeds of the dinner. Thank you Archdiocese of Ottawa!

We are so grateful for the generosity and support shown by Archbishop Terrence Prendergast and all those who attended the fundraising dinner.

Happy news, indeed! We remain so grateful to all our donors whose generosity has made a difference in the lives of so many. Thank you!



Tags: CNEWA Canada

30 November 2018
CNEWA Staff




Now 8-months-old, little Mariam is thriving and healthy after being treated for a hole in her heart. (photo: CNEWA)

In May, we told you about a CNEWA success story from Jordan, 2-month-old Mariam:

Before Mariam was born, her parents came to CNEWA, looking for help. The mother was older, and it was clear she needed a Caesarean delivery. The CNEWA staff directed the family to the Italian Hospital, supported by CNEWA in Amman, and helped pay for the surgery.

The delivery went well, but the doctors discovered that Mariam has a small hole in her heart. She is being treated with drugs and, in time, it is hoped the hole will close and Mariam will have a long life.

This week, Ra’ed Bahou, our regional director in Amman, sent along the picture shown above, with an update:

This is her second visit to our CNEWA office. Mariam and her father stopped by for the distribution of the Christmas food tickets for Iraqi families.

She is healthy and gorgeous.

We’re delighted to share that news with our readers — and grateful, as always, for the generosity of our CNEWA family that continues to make stories like this one possible.



Tags: Jordan

28 November 2018
CNEWA Staff




Among the skills children learn at the Assisi School is how to create jewelry with beads.
(photo: CNEWA)


This week, we received a report from our regional director in India, M.L. Thomas, updating us on a program CNEWA is supporting:

Kaleketty is a remote forest village in the diocese of Kanjirappally in Kerala. CNEWA stretched its hands to help 50 visually impaired children at a school for the blind run by the Congregation of Assisi Sisters of Mary Immaculate.

To help these children develop skills, the sisters conduct academic classes, and also give them training in music, dance, and physical education. They are also trained in rehab programs—making umbrellas, working with rattan and bamboo, or creating jewelry with beads.

CNEWA’s support bought musical instruments, along with mosquito nets, mats, mattresses, medicine and day-to-day living items.

The Assisi Sisters of Mary immaculate (ASMI) which is a Franciscan Congregation of the Syro-Malabar Church, was established in 1949. The congregation was founded to radiate God’s compassionate love to the most rejected of the society — including leprosy patients, the blind, and the mentally handicapped.

The Assisi School for the Blind is a residential school. They have 50 blind children this year studying in 10 grades. Up to grade 7, the students are taught in state syllabus with the help of Braille books. For higher secondary studies, the students stay in the school’s hostel and go to another nearby facility. Proper training, knowledge and encouragement enable them to overcome their disabilities and exceed in life.

We sincerely thank our generous donors for supporting this project. You have not seen these young people, and they cannot see you, but they do visualize you with their hearts. Be assured, they pray for you!



Tags: India

7 November 2018
CNEWA Staff




This week, CNEWA’s president, Msgr. John E. Kozar, received a letter from a longtime friend and partner in the Middle East, Samir Nassar, the Maronite Archbishop of Damascus, Syria.

The note featured this image of a praying St. John Paul II:


Inside was this message:


Archbishop Nassar also included a letter with this poignant plea:

IS SYRIA A FORGOTTEN LAND?

It is often said that the Syrian war is the worst and most cruel seen by the world since the Second World War.

The fact that seemingly much of the violence has died down has made us wonder if Syria is remembered at all by most of the world…what a chaotic scene:

600,000 dead with only some buried in dignity and many others in collective graves. All this has meant that many families live in perpetual sorrow and emotional instability.

200,000 have disappeared, including two bishops and four priests; this has made life a nightmare for those who grieve for their loved ones — parents, friends and the churches who have no news of them.

13,000,000 refugees — a very heavy burden as a consequence of this world war game on the Syrian territory…whole populations who suffer in silence and despair. Bitterness and a loss of meaning to life…a broken people, scattered and searching for a future.

95,000 hands cut off, feet amputated or paralyzed in a country which is ill-prepared to handle these sorts of problems alone, and the subsequent psychological and health consequences.

2,500,000 dwellings demolished or destroyed.

Local currency is valueless and inflation has risen alarmingly; the exodus of the young has marked the remaining hopes for future growth.

Faced with these scenes of desolation in the church in Syria, I cannot fall into the role of a mere spectator. The church is a strong witness of the Spirit and the Light which it brings. She is a sign of the Presence and a witness in the domain of health care, education, pastoral work with the young, family support, accompanying fragile families and supporting in every way the less fortunate. All of this is done in the spirit of forgiveness and reconciliation.

If the world has forgotten Syria, the Lord is watching over her and will not let the boat flounder!

+Samir Nassar

He added a personal handwritten note, too:

Thank you, dear Msgr. Kozar, for the mission of CNEWA in Syria. Our problems are too heavy. Please pray for us. We prepare for Christmas with a heavy Calvary. God bless you for all that you did and do.

Please do not let Syria become a "forgotten land." Their needs are great. Remember them in your prayers.



Tags: Syria





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