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Current Issue
July, 2019
Volume 45, Number 2
  
16 August 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi take part in a protest near Ennour Mosque in Cairo on 16 August, following clashes that left over 600 dead. (photo: CNS/Louafi Larbi, Reuters)

Islamists urge day of ‘rage’ in Cairo to protest military (New York Times) The Muslim Brotherhood, for decades the repository of Islamist sentiment, said it wanted millions to march on Friday to display “the pain and sorrow over the loss of our martyrs.” On Thursday, many of those waiting outside a makeshift morgue talked of civil war. Some blamed members of Egypt’s Coptic Christian minority for supporting the military takeover. A few argued openly for a turn to violence. “The solution might be an assassination list,” said Ahmed, 27, who like others refused to use his full name for fear of reprisals from the new authorities. “Shoot anyone in uniform. It doesn’t matter if the good is taken with the bad, because that is what happened to us last night.” Mohamed Rasmy, a 30-year-old engineer, interrupted. “That is not the solution,” he said, insisting that Islamist leaders would re-emerge with a plan “to come together in protest.” He argued that the bloodshed was now turning the rest of the public against the military-appointed government. “It is already happening,” he said…

Coptic bishop: No civil war in Egypt (America magazine) A Coptic Catholic bishop who served as a member of the assembly that drafted Egypt’s 2012 constitution said his country will not have a civil war, and foreign powers — including the United Nations — should not interfere. In a wide-ranging interview with Arab West Report, Bishop Youhanna Golta of Alexandria also said people must view Egypt as a whole and not just be concerned about Coptic Christians. He discussed the history of Islam and asked for patience for Egyptian democracy, reminding people that European democracy took four centuries to evolve, and Egyptians have only had two or three years. “Civil war is when a part of the country turns against the other part. This is not the case in Egypt. … In Egypt, the people are united against a certain group that doesn’t represent more than 2 percent of the country,” he said, referring to extremists within the Muslim Brotherhood. “With respect to the burning of the churches, I said today in the Akhbar newspaper that ’burning of the churches makes us [Christians] proud, because we are contributing to the liberation of Egypt,’ ” said the bishop, who serves as an assistant to the Coptic Catholic patriarch…

Working-class Cairo neighborhood contemplates recent tragedy (New York Times) Egypt seems more divided than ever after a brutal day of violence here that left hundreds of people dead. Supporters of the ousted president, Muhammad Morsi, mourned those killed, vowed revenge, planned their next moves. Many other Egyptians, though, directed their ire at the protesters who had camped out in the streets for weeks. For them, what occurred made sense. “It was necessary,” Akmal William, standing in his auto-detailing shop on Talaat Harb Street, said of the raid by soldiers and police officers. “They had to be strict.” Witnesses described a disproportionate, ruthless attack. Condemnations came from human rights advocates, a few Egyptian political figures, and from abroad. But many Egyptians viewed things differently, focusing on what they said were continuing threats from Mr. Morsi’s supporters, who were frequently referred to as terrorists. In their view, the army was the only force standing in the Islamists’ way. Between the parallel realities, others were torn between the claims of the security forces of violent demonstrators who threatened the country — a view parroted by the state news media — and what they heard from Islamist friends about how the battle on the streets had unfolded on Wednesday morning…

Pope asks Mary to bring calm to Egypt (CNS) As the official death toll emerged from the 14 August clashes in Egypt and as the damage done to Christian churches was being assessed, Pope Francis invoked Mary, queen of peace, to bring calm to the country. In light of the “painful news” coming from Egypt on 15 August, the feast of the Assumption of Mary, Pope Francis said he was praying for “all the victims and their families, for the injured and those who are suffering…”

U.N. chief arrives to aid Israeli-Palestinian negotiations (Los Angeles Times) United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon arrived in Ramallah Thursday in a bid to boost Palestinian-Israeli negotiations launched in Jerusalem the day before after three years of deadlock. Speaking at a news conference with his host, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, Ban expressed strong support for efforts to revive the peace talks, promising to do everything he could as United Nations chief to reach the goal of two states for two peoples…

Beirut car bomb kills 21 (Washington Post) A powerful car bomb ripped through a busy shopping street in Hezbollah’s stronghold in the southern suburbs of Beirut on Thursday, killing at least 21 people and injuring hundreds in the deadliest attack to hit the Lebanese capital in more than eight years. The explosion early Thursday evening tore the facades off apartment buildings and set afire parked cars in the Ruwais neighborhood, an area of staunch support for Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shiite movement…

In India, people thirsty despite rain (The Hindu) “Whether monsoon or summer, the people of Upper Kuttanad are left to bear the bane of drinking water scarcity, despite being surrounded by water round the year,” says Sreedharan Nair, an elderly farmer in the Upper Kuttanad village of Nedumpram. Potable water has become a precious commodity, as the well water, reddish yellow water with a bad taste and odor, is unsuitable for consumption. The recent floods have further contaminated well water, leaving the people to depend solely on the Kerala Water Authority for their daily drinking water needs. A drinking water management and sanitation scheme of Bodhana, a social service organization associated with the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, has turned out to be a solace in some areas…



Tags: Egypt Pope Francis Lebanon Middle East Peace Process Syro-Malankara Catholic Church