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Current Issue
December, 2018
Volume 44, Number 4
  
13 March 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A man runs while carrying a child who survived what activists say was an airstrike by government forces in Aleppo on 21 January. (photo: CNS/Ammar Abdullah, Reuters)

Aleppo TV provides lifeline in wartime (Al Jazeera) On TV, a group of boys play soccer in a street littered with broken concrete, amid apartment buildings scarred by bullet and shell holes. One of the boys accidentally kicks the ball down an alley, where it comes to rest near a hidden mine. As the boy is just inches from stepping on the detonator, a Syrian opposition fighter scoops him up. An announcer’s voice warns children to beware of mines and unexploded ordnance. This is one of the messages that the Syrian satellite TV station Aleppo Today airs daily that, along with its news programs and a breaking-news ticker, have made it the most popular network for current residents of Aleppo, refugees who have fled the war-torn city and opposition fighters in Syria’s north. The 24-hour, opposition-aligned news channel started a few months after the uprising began in Syria in March 2011, in order to cover protests and broadcast news about the uprising against President Bashar al Assad, back when it was hard to find any independent, non-government-controlled news out of Syria’s largest city…

Syrian women refugees humiliated, exploited in Turkey (Al Monitor) Women refugees from Syria are being sexually harassed by employers, landlords and even aid distributors in Lebanon, reported Human Rights Watch late in November. The organization “interviewed a dozen women who described being groped, harassed and pressured to have sex.” According to refugees, young Syrian women are facing the same difficulties in Turkey, including early marriages, abuse and even prostitution. Although Turkey is arguably one of the countries most hospitable toward Syrian refugees, these problems are reportedly on the rise…

Despite politics, Israeli doctors treat Syrians (Christian Science Monitor) The West Galilee Hospital in Nahariya is no stranger to war. Located only six miles south of the Lebanese border, it took a direct missile hit during the 2006 conflict with Hezbollah. But the Syrian war has pervaded these halls and wards in a much more personal way: through wounded Syrians, who are picked up at the border and brought here by the Israeli military for free treatment. Israel has a tradition of offering humanitarian assistance in war zones and natural disasters around the world, even where it is not particularly welcome. But treating Syrians, whose country is still officially at war with Israel, is not only a logistical miracle but also an extraordinary exercise in humanity trumping hate…

Gaza ceasefire agreed after two-day flareup (Reuters) Egypt brokered a ceasefire on Thursday aimed at ending a flare-up of rocket attacks from Gaza on Israeli towns and Israeli air strikes in the Palestinian enclave, the Islamic Jihad militant group said. There was no immediate word from Israel, but a senior Defense Ministry official said earlier in the day he expected the fighting to die down soon. “Following intensive Egyptian contacts and efforts, the agreement for calm has been restored in accordance with understandings reached in 2012 in Cairo,” Khaled al Batsh, an Islamic Jihad leader, wrote on Facebook, referring to a truce that ended an eight-day Gaza war two years ago…

Egypt may have to wait for presidential vote (Los Angeles Times) Egypt’s presidential election, previously set for this spring, could be pushed back to midsummer, state media reported, shifting the deadline from mid-april to 17 July. Political parties have been arguing over a contentious new election law that rules out legal challenges to the results as determined by the country’s main electoral body. Critics call the measure unconstitutional, and the only declared candidate in the presidential race so far, leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, says it casts doubt on the integrity of any vote…

Ukrainian Catholics fear ‘new oppression’ after Russian takeover (National Catholic Reporter) A Ukrainian Catholic priest in Crimea said church members are alarmed and frightened by the Russian military occupation and fear their communities might be outlawed again if Russian rule becomes permanent. The Rev. Mykhailo Milchakovskyi, a pastor in Kerch, Ukraine, described the atmosphere as tense because many residents of the town located in the eastern part of Crimea were unsure of their future. “No one knows what will happen. Many people are trying to sell their homes and move to other parts of Ukraine,” Father Milchakovskyi told Catholic News Service on Wednesday…



Tags: Syria Egypt Ukraine Gaza Strip/West Bank Israeli-Palestinian conflict