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Current Issue
July, 2019
Volume 45, Number 2
  
2 April 2014
Greg Kandra




Village boys in Ethiopia receive oral instruction from an Orthodox scribe, or debtera. (photo: Sean Sprague)

Eight years ago, we took a look at the Christian influence on schools in Ethiopia:

The impact of Christian monastic education in Ethiopia should not be underestimated, said David Bridges, chairman of the Von Hügel Institute, a Catholic research facility at St. Edmund’s College at the University of Cambridge. “There is a rich historic tradition of education associated with Christianity that goes back almost as long as the church itself,” he said. “At the village level, wandering priests bring teaching to scattered rural communities, usually in return for subsistence food and shelter. At the higher levels people study for 30 to 40 years to take the full curriculum of the church, with its different branches for music, literature, philosophy, theology and specialized forms of poetry.”

Mr. Bridges lamented the fact that this tradition tends to be overlooked by international consultants in education.

Read more about Making the Grade in Ethiopia in the March 2006 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ethiopia Education Orthodox