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Current Issue
March, 2019
Volume 45, Number 1
  
5 June 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2008, Bat-El Shmueli plays with her daughter at their home in Haifa.
(photo: Ilene Perlman)


In 2008, we profiled a remarkable group of immigrants in Israel: Ethiopian Jews, some of whom were having difficulty adjusting to their new homeland:

The transition into modern Israeli society has been especially wrenching for older immigrants, said Bat-El Shmueli, E.N.P.’s feisty program coordinator in Haifa and Tirat Hacarmel.

In one of its many programs for Ethiopian adults, Ms. Shmueli helps Ethiopian adults ages 35 to 80 to “learn about life in Israel.”

She said that, for the most part, “they don’t know Hebrew, they don’t have good jobs and they feel distanced from their children who have grown up here and feel and act Israeli.”

Men “often feel powerless, useless, displaced. In Ethiopia they were kings of their homes, villages and communities. Here, everyone tells them what to do.”

According to a recent study by I.A.E.J., 32 percent of Ethiopian-Israeli fathers and 10 percent of mothers are employed; 70 percent of families earn no income, relying entirely on public assistance. Many of those who work do not clear the poverty line.

The fact that more and more Ethiopian-Israeli children have an education and are finding good jobs “is a source of immense pride to their parents, but also a source of alienation,” Ms. Shmueli added.

Read more about “Challenges for a Land of Immigrants” in the November 2008 edition of ONE.