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Current Issue
July, 2019
Volume 45, Number 2
  
26 October 2015
Greg Kandra




A Syrian refugee is seen cooking at Atma, a camp formed by more than 100,000 people under the control of the Free Syrian Army in Idlib, Syria. An outbreak of cholera in the country is raising fears that the disease could spread. (photo: Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Cholera outbreak in Syria sparks fear of “international threat” (The Independent) Cholera has broken out in Syria, with one child having already died after contracting the disease — and the outbreak could constitute an “international threat.” The break-out, which follows one in Iraq, could spread rapidly, according to Dr Ahmad Tarakji, president of the Syrian American Medical Society (Sams), the largest medical NGO still working in Syria. Speaking to The Independent, Dr Tarakji said that Syria’s already crippled medical infrastructure, and the lack of access available to aid agencies, meant the disease could spread quickly, both inside the country and across borders...

Kerry: Israel and Jordan agree on steps to ease tensions in Jerusalem (The New York Times) Seeking to end the latest round of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, Secretary of State John Kerry said on Saturday that Israel and Jordan had agreed to take steps toward defusing tensions at one of Jerusalem’s holiest sites, whose fate has been at the center of recent bloodshed...

Ukraine holds local elections (The Wall Street Journal) Ukrainians voted Sunday in local elections that will test support for the country’s pro-Western President Petro Poroshenko, who is under pressure over a deep economic contraction and perceived lack of progress fighting corruption...

Pope addresses Chaldean Synod (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Monday (26 October) addressed the members of the Synod of the Chaldean Church, reminding them that “the only authority is the authority of service, the only power is the power of the Cross”...

A Muslim perspective on Nostra Aetate (Vatican Radio) Wednesday 28 October marks the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council declaration, Nostra Aetate, which profoundly reshaped the Catholic Church’s relationship with people of other faiths. Issued in the closing weeks of the Council in 1965, the document for the first time urged Catholics to recognize the truth present in other religions and to work together with other believers for the benefit of all of humanity. During a recent conference at Georgetown University In Washington DC, organised by the Ecclesiological Investigations International Research Network, experts and scholars from other faiths discussed the impact that document has had on their own communities...

Catholic Church condemns dalit burning in India (Vatican Radio) A Catholic Church official in India said the recent burning to death of two dalit children was the latest in a series of atrocities against the former lower-caste group. The church “sternly condemns the sad incident,” Father Z. Devasagayaraj, secretary of the Office for Dalit Development of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India said in a statement on 23 October. “It is an inhuman act of which our nation should be ashamed. There have been repeated atrocities against the dalits in different parts of India,” the priest said...

Notre Dame begins regular Byzantine liturgy (Aleteia) The first Byzantine liturgy on Notre Dame’s campus has begun, and once a month, at least in the beginning, those who are from Eastern Christian traditions and those who are just curious will have a chance to participate. Father Anatolios is a newly ordained priest of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, one of twenty-two Eastern churches in communion with Rome. When his bishop knew that he was going to be moving to South Bend, Indiana, to teach theology, he asked if there could be “a Byzantine Catholic presence on the campus of the most prominent Catholic university in America,” Father Anatolios told the Notre Dame Observer. It’s not that the Byzantine liturgy is unknown on college campuses. There are Orthodox campus ministies, and there’s a Byzantine Catholic Mission at Penn State, with a liturgy offered every Sunday. And near the campus of the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, there is a Ukrainian shrine, with divine liturgy offered on Sundays. But Notre Dame seems to be the first Catholic university in the United States where an Eastern liturgy will be celebrated on campus on a regular basis...



Tags: Syria India Ukraine Muslim Chaldeans